M2M Leggings Part 3 – Drafting

Post-calculation

For this step you will need the rest of the materials list from the first post on the topic (OMG FOREVER AGO)

[Step 1] – Prep

Roll out a piece of paper that’s about 8-12″ longer than your total length number and fold it in half so that a crease runs through the center of the paper, parallel to the long edge.

Debbie knew she would need a lot more paper for the thighs, so she taped two rolls of paper next to each other:

Straight Edge Time

[Step 2] – Prep

About 3 inches from one of the short edges of the paper, draw a horizontal line across the full width, perpendicular to the crease.

[Step 3] – Length reference

Now, right along the vertical crease, starting at the horizontal line you just drew, draw a line that corresponds to your total length measurement.

[NOTE]

Now here’s the tricky part to explain, but the most important technique for the rest of the pattern drafting. You are going to center your (insert anatomy here) circumference measurement over this total length line as we go up the rest of the leg. So for each of these circumferences, half of the total measurement should be on either side of the total length line, and the circumference should be marked perpendicularly to the total length line.

[Step 4] – Ankle

At the first horizontal line we drew, mark out your ankle circumference using the technique described above.

[Step 5] – Shin

From the ankle circumference line, measure along the total length line and mark the end of the shank length measurement. This mark corresponds to where your knee is in the leggings.

[Step 6] – Knee

At the mark corresponding to the end of the shank length measurement, mark out your knee circumference using the same technique we used for the ankle circumference.

[Step 7] – Thigh

From the knee circumference line, measure along the total length line and mark the end of the thigh length measurement. This mark corresponds to where we measured the size of our thighs.

[Step 8] – Thigh meats

At the mark corresponding to the end of the thigh length measurement, mark out your thigh circumference using the same technique we used for the ankle and knee circumferences.

[NOTE]

Now here is where we finally do something different. First, decide which side of the pattern is going to be your REAR side and which is going to be your FRONT side. I highly recommend writing a little note to that effect directly on the pattern piece.

[Step 9] – Crotches

 

ON THE REAR SIDE

 

Measure from the end of the thigh circumference line, along the thigh circumference line, back towards the total length line, and mark the end of the rear rise width measurement. You should have a mark that is on the thigh circumference line. From this mark, perpendicularly to the thigh circumference line (and parallel to the total length line) in the direction opposite the ankle circumference line, draw a line corresponding to the length of the rear crotch depth measurement.

ON THE FRONT SIDE

Measure from the end of the thigh circumference line, along the thigh circumference line, back towards the total length line, and mark the end of the front rise width measurement. You should have a mark that is on the thigh circumference line. From this mark, perpendicularly to the thigh circumference line (and parallel to the total length line) in the direction opposite the ankle circumference line, draw a line corresponding to the length of the front crotch depth measurement.

[Step 10] – Connect the dots

Now connect the tops of the two depth lines, at whatever angle they occur. This is really not going to line up with your total length and that is perfectly fine!

Connect the ends of the ankle circumference line with the ends of the knee circumference line. Connect the ends of the knee circumference line with the ends of the thigh circumference line.

Now you have a very very angular paper leg.

[Step 11] I CAN BE SMOOTH

French Curve Time

Now, starting at the line corresponding to the knee circumference measurement, take the french curve (or, feeling bold, an adequate ability to free-hand) and smooth out all the sharp corners where the lines are connected. Just rotate the curve around until it fits along the straight lines in a way that seems anatomically logical and trace along the edge to smooth out corners.

[NOTE]

At the crotches you’re going to draw a line that sort of corresponds to my doodle:

BUT here’s the thing, it also needs to correspond to your actual body. For a front crotch, you want the curve to be shallow, as in, a nearly straight diagonal line that still connects smoothly.

For a rear crotch, it’s totally person-dependent. If you have a LOT of booty, you will need a deeper, more L or C shaped curve or the back of your leggings will ride down. If you have very little booty, you will need a shallower curve that looks closer to a straight diagonal line. Here’s where you gotta be honest with yourself, and if you screw it up, make another pair of leggings with a different crotchal shape. In general, you should get something perfectly wearable out of a first attempt.

 

YAY YOU HAVE A PAPER LEG!

[Step 12] – Yay markers are fun!

Take a thicker pen or colored marker and trace along your finalized curves, so just along the outside of your paper leg to make the cutting easier.

Draw arrowheads on the total length line to mark the grain direction.

[Step 13] – Waistband (optional)

Debbie’s a butt and did the waistband with a fold.

On another piece of paper, draft out a rectangle with the dimensions of (your waist circumference) by 6 inches.

Draw a short line parallel to the short edge of the rectangle and add arrows on either end to mark the grain direction.

[NOTE]

If you don’t want to do a waistband, but would rather have elastic, that’s totally cool and I will explain how to cut that in the cutting post!

Compared to M6173 size large. Less thigh meats, and leg meats (out of frame). Much different angle on both front and back. This might take Debbie more attempts to get right, but it’s a good starting point.